How to Apply for Ohio Unemployment

You may file a new application for Ohio unemployment benefits, or restart an existing claim, by internet or phone after you gather the necessary information.

877-644-6562
888-642-8203 for TTY service.
(During Business Hours)

http://unemployment.ohio.gov (available 24/7)

 

Pay Attention To and Follow Deadlines

When ODJFS requests information, or you have the right to appeal, the notices will contain a deadline.  The penalty for failing to respond timely may be a complete denial of your benefits.  Take these deadlines seriously and do not miss any.

John Sivinski Top Attorney

When Should You Apply for Unemployment?

File for unemployment as soon as you become unemployed.  This is true even if you are subject to a waiting week or receiving severance pay from your employer.

In What State Should You Apply?

If you live or worked in Ohio, you may file an unemployment application in Ohio.

File Weekly Claims Timely

If you file weekly claims late, even during the appeal process, you may forever lose eligibility for that week.  If the online system does not accept your claim, pick up the phone to call ODJFS to find out why and insist they take your claims.

What Information Will You Need?

The following is a checklist of information to gather to make your application:

-  Your name, address, telephone number, e-mail address, social security number, driver's license or state ID number.

-  Your regular occupation and job skills

-  Name, address, telephone number, and dates of employment with each employer you worked for during the past 6 weeks

-  The reason you became unemployed from each employer

-  Dependents' names, Social Security numbers, and dates of birth

-  If claiming dependents, your spouse's name, Social Security number, and birth date

-  If you are not a U.S. citizen or national, alien registration number and expiration date

-  If you had out-of-state employment, have worked for the federal government, or are separated from military service, more information is required, including: Form DD-214, member 4 copy (for military service), and SF-8 or SF-50 form (for federal government employment)

No Upfront Fees

 

Sivinski Law Offices offers Free Initial Consultations.  We additionally offer contingency agreements whenever possible, with no up-front fee.  We collect a fee ONLY if we are successful in obtaining unemployment benefits that are owed to you.  We also offer flat fees and hourly rates when a contingency fee agreement is not appropriate.  Our goal is always to provide you with high quality representation to protect your rights.  You have nothing to risk or lose by calling the Ohio Unemployment Attorneys at Sivinski Law Offices for your free consultation, so call us today before any of your unemployment appeal rights are lost.

Are You Eligible for Unemployment?

Totally unemployed means you performed no service for your employer, and no earnings or income are payable to you during the week you apply for benefits, you are totally unemployed.

 

Partially unemployed means your hours were reduced from full-time and your earnings are less than what your weekly unemployment benefit amount would be.

You must be totally or partially unemployed.

You must have become unemployed through no fault of your own as defined by law.

This can include a variety of circumstances, and you may be eligible if you are unemployed due to a lack of work (e.g., job abolished, business closed, etc…); because you were terminated (fired) without just cause; because you resigned (quit) with just cause; or are kept from working due to a lockout during a labor dispute.  Other factors, such as whether you were a teacher or engaged in seasonal employment can also impact this determination.  If you find your claim becomes denied, remember to contact an experienced unemployment attorney.

You must have at least 20 weeks of covered employment during your base period.

Covered employment.  The vast majority of employers are subject to unemployment and therefore your work for them is covered employment.  There are some exceptions, however, such as working for religious organizations.

 

Base Period.  Your base period may be either your Regular Base Period or your Alternate Base Period.  This gets complicated to explain, but the following chart simplifies the periods.  The Regular Base Period is the first four of the last five completed calendar quarters, and the Alternate Base Period is the last four completed calendar quarters before your claim begins.  First look to your Regular Base Period, and if you do not qualify then look at the Alternate Base Period.

RECENT CASES/NEWS

Unemployment Appeal Won - Job Requirements Changed Substantially After Hiring.: Employee accused of failing to meet job expectations approved for benefits, including nearly $7,000 in back-payments, because the job substantially changed. (Benefits Approved 6/20/2017)

Unemployment Appeal Won - Showed Employer Lacked Just Cause to Terminate: It was shown that the employer lacked sufficient proof to terminate an employee for hanging up on a customer. (Benefits Approved 6/8/2017)

Unemployment Appeal Won - Employee Had Just Cause to Resign: Employee who was put on light duty had just cause to resign when the employer offered not positions that would conform to the light duty requirements. (Benefits Approved 6/2/2017)

Unemployment Appeal Won - Management Delays Do Not Justify Terminating Employee: We showed that accusations that employee was terminated because projects were delayed were insufficient for just cause because the delays were due to management rather than the employee. (Benefits Approved 5/19/2017)

Unemployment Appeal Won - Venting About Discipline is Not Just Cause to Terminate: Employer who terminated employee for closing their office door and venting to a friend and co-worker about being put on a performance improvement plan did not have just cause for the termination. (Benefits Approved 5/18/2017)

Unemployment Appeal Won - Rules Must Be Applied Reasonably: Although the hearing officer concluded that the employee violated a rule, we were able to convince her that the rule was not applied reasonably and that the termination without prior discipline was without just cause. (Benefits Approved 5/17/2017)

Unemployment Appeal Won - Employee's Reasonable Deviations from Policies Not Just Cause to Terminate: Employer who left employee short staffed lacked just cause to terminate the employee for deviations from policy when those deviations were reasonable and did not cause any harm to the employer. (Benefits Approved 5/8/2017)

Unemployment Appeal Won - Employer Lacks Just Cause to Terminate for Absence: Employer who did not follow its own progressive discipline policy, and then issued a termination for an absence due to an illness with medical documentation, lacked just cause. (Benefits Approved 4/24/2017)

Unemployment Appeal Won - Employer Could Not Convert Layoff into a Termination: Employer who asked employee if he wanted a voluntary layoff and then did not offer him any work could not use a prior incident as a justification to terminate - the employee was laid off due to a lack of work. (Benefits Approved 4/24/2017)

Unemployment Appeal Won - Showed the Hearing Officer that the Employee Did Not Commit Misconduct: Employer failed to show any misconduct after last discipline and therefore lacked just cause to then terminate. (Benefits Approved 4/7/2017)

Unemployment Appeal Won - Giving Accurate Information is Not Just Cause to Terminate: Employee payroll coordinator was terminated without just cause for sharing tax information with employee when it was shown that the information was accurate and followed procedure. (Benefits Approved 4/3/2017)

Unemployment Appeal Won - Employer Lacked Just Cause When It Skipped Discipline Steps: Hearing Officer agreed that the Employer failed to follow its progressive discipline policy and, as a result, it lacked just cause to terminate our client. (Benefits Approved 3/29/2017)

Regular Base Period

If Claim Begins Between:

Regular Base Period Is:

7/3/2016 through 10//2016

4/1/2015 through 3/31/2016

10/2/2016 through 12/31/2016

7/1/2015 through 6/30/2016

1/1/2017 through 4/1/2017

10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016

4/2/2017 through 7/1/2017

1/1/2016 through 12/31/2016

7/2/2017 through 9/30/2017

4/1/2016 through 3/31/2017

10/1/2017 through 1/6/2018

7/1/2016 through 7/30/2017

Alternate Base Period

If Claim Begins Between:

Alternate Base Period Is:

7/3/2016 through 10/1/2016

7/1/2015 through 6/30/2016

10/2/2016 through 12/31/2016

10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016

1/1/2017 through 4/1/2017

1/1/2016 through 12/31/2016

4/2/2017 through 7/1/2017

4/1/2016 through 3/31/2017

7/2/2017 through 9/30/2017

7/1/2016 through 6/30/2017

10/1/2017 through 1/6/2018

10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017

For claims filed in 2017, you must have average gross (before taxes and deductions) weekly earnings of at least $247 during your base period.

To determine your average gross weekly earnings, take earnings during your base period and divide it by the number of qualifying weeks.

 

For example, if you earned $12,500 during your base period, and you had 25 qualifying weeks, your average weekly earnings would be $500 ($12,500 in earnings ÷ 25 qualifying weeks = $500 average weekly earnings)

How Much Will You Receive?

Your weekly benefit amount will be 1/2 of your average weekly earnings during your base period, up to a maximum limit that varies each year.  This maximum limit depends upon your number of allowable dependents.

2017 Maximum Limits

Dependents:

Maximum Limits:

0

$443

1 or 2

$537

3 or more

$598

For example, if your average weekly earnings was $1000, then your weekly benefit amount would be $500 ($1,000 ÷ 2 = $500) before the maximum limits.  Therefore, if you had 0 dependents, your weekly benefit amount exceeds the maximum limit of $443.00, and you would therefore receive the limit of $443.00.  If you had 1 or 2 dependents, however, the maximum limit would be $537.00.  You would therefore receive your full weekly benefit amount of $500.00, because it does not exceed the maximum limit for 1 or 2 dependents.

Deductible Income

Your unemployment benefit MAY be reduced by the following types of deductible income:  Severance pay, Vacation pay, Pensions, Company buy-out plans, and Workers' Compensation.  On the other hand, your benefit should not be reduced by these forms of income:  Social Security, Supplemental unemployment benefits (S.U.B.), US national guard/armed forces reserve pay for scheduled drills, Interest dividends, Rental income

You may earn up to 20% of your weekly benefit amount without any deduction.  After that 20%, your weekly benefit amount will be reduced by what you earn.  For example, if your weekly benefit amount is $400, you may earn 20% of $400 ($80) without any impact to your weekly benefit amount.  However, you must report any earnings.

As an example, if your weekly benefit amount is $400, and you earn $300 during a week, your weekly benefit amount for that week will be $180.00.

Exemption Amount:
$400.00 (weekly benefit amount)
x 20%
= $80.00 (exemption)

Deductible Income:
$300 (earnings)
- $80.00 (exemption)
= $220.00 (deductible income)

Benefit payment:  $400 - $220 = $180.00

How Long Will You Receive Benefits?

Unemployment benefits continue up to a maximum of between 20 and 26 weeks, depending on the number of your qualifying weeks in your base period.  This can be, and has been, extended during times of economic hardship.

 

To maintain your benefits during this time, there are certain registration requirements, and you must file weekly claims to show unemployment that you are (a) able to work; (b) available for work; and (c) actively seeking work.

What Next?

Your claim will be assigned to a processing center, who will send a questionnaire to your previous employer about your claim.  As ODJFS determines your eligibility, they may ask you for more information.  You will receive notices from ODJFS either by mail or e-mail, depending on the method you selected.  If your claim is denied, or your employer appeals a granting of your eligibility, you should contact an attorney for help through the appeal process.

Improve Your Chance to Obtain Benefits

 

The unemployment benefit appeal process does provide opportunities to obtain a determination in your favor, but you must have knowledge of the laws, the rules, and have the required tools to obtain and present evidence on your behalf.

 

The fact is, ODJFS does not operate based on what you know to be true, unless that truth can be shown to them, proven to them, and explained in a way that they can understand that Ohio statutes and rules require them to give you benefits.

 

The Ohio Unemployment Lawyers at Sivinski Law Offices have the expertise and experience to navigate through the Unemployment Appeal process and to present the best case possible to obtain the benefits you deserve.   It is a simple decision: If you want to increase your chances of obtaining benefits, take advantage of a free consultation with the Ohio Unemployment Lawyers at Sivinski Law Offices.

Contact Us For A
Free Telephone Consultation

Submitting Form...

The server encountered an error.

Message received.  Thank you.

 

Sivinski Law Offices, ltd.

Suite 215

20545 Center Ridge Rd.

Rocky River, OH 44116

Phone: 800-641-1970

Fax: 855-241-0700

contact@sshllc.com

 

https://SivinskiLegal.com

Updated June 2017

Copyright 2015 - 2017

Brian J. Smith.
All rights reserved. 
Disclaimer & Privacy Policy

Ohio State Bar Association - OSBA
Clients Choice Criminal Defense Attorneys
Superb Litigation Attorneys
DUI Defense Lawyers Association
National College for DUI Defense
Catholic Attorneys

Sivinski Law Offices, ltd provides legal services throughout Ohio, from Cleveland to Toledo, including Sandusky, Akron, Vermilion, Huron, Elyria, Lorain, Port Clinton, Rocky River, Parma, Oak Harbor, Norwalk, Milan, Amherst, Sheffield, Avon, Oberlin, North Ridgeville, North Olmsted, Bay Village, Westlake, Cleveland Heights, Lakewood, Brook Park, Strongsville, Garfield Heights, Euclid, Medina, Maple Heights, Bellevue, Clyde and Berea, and within counties such as Cuyahoga, Lorain, Erie, Ottawa, Lucas, Portage, Sandusky, Seneca, Huron, Medina, Summit, Portage, Geauga County, Lake, Ashtabula.

John Sivinski Top Attorney
Clients Choice Criminal Defense Attorneys
Superb Litigation Attorneys
Ohio Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers - OACDL
Ohio State Bar Association - OSBA
Lorain County Bar Association
DUI Defense Lawyers Association
National College for DUI Defense
Cleveland Metro Bar Association - CMBA
West Shore Bar Association - WSBA
Ohio Employment Lawyers Association - OELA
John Sivinski Top Attorney
Cleveland Metro Bar Association - CMBA
Ohio State Bar Association - OSBA
Ohio Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers - OACDL
Ohio Employment Lawyers Association - OELA
West Shore Bar Association - WSBA
Clients Choice Criminal Defense Attorneys
National College for DUI Defense
DUI Defense Lawyers Association
Superb Litigation Attorneys
John Sivinski Top Attorney
John A. Sivinski, AV Preeminent Attorney
John A. Sivinski, Million Dollar Advocate
Cleveland Metro Bar Association - CMBA
National College for DUI Defense
DUI Defense Lawyers Association
West Shore Bar Association - WSBA
Ohio State Bar Association - OSBA
Lorain County Bar Association
Ohio Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers - OACDL
Ohio Employment Lawyers Association - OELA
Superb Litigation Attorneys
Clients Choice Criminal Defense Attorneys
Master Card
Visa
Discover
John A. Sivinski, AV Preeminent Attorney
John A. Sivinski, Million Dollar Advocate
Ohio Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers - OACDL
Ohio Employment Lawyers Association - OELA
Ohio State Bar Association - OSBA
Lorain County Bar Association
Cleveland Metro Bar Association - CMBA
National College for DUI Defense
DUI Defense Lawyers Association
West Shore Bar Association - WSBA
Superb Litigation Attorneys
Clients Choice Criminal Defense Attorneys
Master Card
Visa
Discover